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Criminal Justice/ Special Topics, CRJU 410-001: Understanding Motivation and Behaviors of Offenders

Crimes of passion, violent crimes, serial crimes, victims and offenders. This libguide will help you find the information that Bowie State University has to offer for this course.

Psychology of Serial Killers with Jim Clemente

In the Collection

Research Port Articles from Criminal Justice Abstracts

Campbell, J., Sellen, J. L., & McMurran, M. (2010). Personal aspirations and concerns inventory for offenders: Developments in the measurement of offenders' motivation. Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health, 20(2), 144-157. doi:10.1002/cbm.761


Abstract: Background It is important to attend to offenders' motivation for treatment and behaviour change, either as a treatment selection criterion or a pre-treatment need. One measure of motivation that has been used with forensic populations is the Personal Concerns Inventory (PCI) and a PCI-Offender Adaptation (PCI-OA). As well as demonstrating promise in measuring offenders' motivation, the administration of the PCI and PCI-OA shows potential as a motivation enhancer. However, a number of potentially useful changes to the PCI-OA that may maximize its potential have been identified. These are described here. Method The rationale and process of abridgement and further development of the PCI-OA into the Personal Aspirations and Concerns Inventory for Offenders (PACI-O) are described.


Tierney, D. W., & McCabe, M. P. (2004). The assessment of motivation for behaviour change among sex offenders against children: An investigation of the utility of the Stages of Change Questionnaire. Journal Of Sexual Aggression, 10(2), 237-249. doi:10.1080/13552600412331289041


Abstract: A better understanding of motivation for behaviour change among sex offenders against children would improve treatment programmes designed to modify sexual offending behaviour. However, investigation of this issue is limited by lack of theoretically and empirically sound measures of motivation for behaviour change among sex offenders. This paper reports on two studies that were conducted to investigate the psychometric properties (validity, reliability, and social desirability) of the Stages of Change Questionnaire, adapted to measure motivation for behaviour change among sex offenders against children


Zhang, L., Welte, J. W., & Wieczorek, W. W. (2002). THE ROLE OF AGGRESSION-RELATED ALCOHOL EXPECTANCIES IN EXPLAINING THE LINK BETWEEN ALCOHOL AND VIOLENT BEHAVIOR. Substance Use & Misuse, 37(4), 457-471.


Abstract: Studies have demonstrated an acute effect of alcohol on violent behavior. A remaining issue is the motivation of some offenders for using alcohol before offending. A common explanation is based on the relationship between daily drinking habit and drinking before offending. Drawing upon the deviance disavowal assumption, the embolden hypothesis, and expectancy theories, the present study argues that alcohol may be used intentionally to promote or excuse the violent consequences of drinking. Using data from the 1993 Buffalo Longitudinal Study of Young Men, the present study examines the independent effect of aggression-related alcohol expectancies on drinking before offending and the interactive effect of aggression-related alcohol expectancies and daily alcohol consumption on drinking before offending.